InteManager Daily News 12.11.2019.

1. Container barge aground, British Columbia

Container barge NANA PROVIDER, loaded with rail cars and empty containers, ran aground at around 0340 UTC Nov 10 south of Quathiaski Cove, Quadra Island, British Columbia. Barge was towed by tug POLAR KING and according to track, broke free before grounding. It was planned to refloat barge during the day Nov 10 with high tide, but plan was rejected after survey detected hull breach or breaches. Salvage attempts were postponed, to be resumed on Nov 11. Alaska Marine Lines operates the barge. http://maritimebulletin.net/2019/11/11/container-barge-aground-british-columbia/

2. Coastal cargo ship sank in West Papua waters, Indonesia

Landing craft LCT MARUNI PRATAMA with cargo of sand and cement sank early in the morning Nov 10 in Manokwari Regency waters, northeast of West Papua, Indonesia. The ship with 11 crew was en route from Manokwari to Teluk Wondama Regency, south of Manokwari, but was caught in rough seas, started taking on water, and sank. All crew went into life raft and were picked up, reportedly, by local fishermen. http://maritimebulletin.net/2019/11/10/coastal-cargo-ship-sank-in-west-papua-waters-indonesia/

3. Two bulk carriers including Panamax aground in Parana river UPDATES

Bulk carrier CL RIZHAO ran aground at 342 kilometer mark, Parana river below San Nicolas, Argentina, at 0215 UTC Nov 9, while sailing downstream partially loaded with 43615 tons of soy beans. Channel reported to be completely blocked. The ship’s next call is in Brazil to complete shipment, bound for Vietnam.

Nov 10: Was refloated at around 0045 UTC Nov 10, taken downstream to Ramallo, anchored for inspection. http://maritimebulletin.net/2019/11/09/two-bulk-carrier-including-panamax-aground-in-parana-river/

4. New report highlights health, nature and climate benefits of reducing ship speeds

On the eve of the latest round of UN ship climate negotiations at the International Maritime Organisation in London, a new report published by Seas at Risk and Transport & Environment has highlighted how slower ship speeds would massively reduce the damage shipping is causing to human health, nature and the climate. https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/new-report-highlights-health-nature-and-climate-benefits-of-reducing-ship-speeds/

5. China is Likely to Cap Annual Coal Imports at 300 Million Tons

China will likely hold annual coal imports at between 200 million and 300 million tons, according to the president of a top industry body, suggesting that the pace of shipments so far in 2019 could tail off in the last two months and establishing a cap on expectations for subsequent years. https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/china-is-likely-to-cap-annual-coal-imports-at-300-million-tons/

6. U.S. scoops up overseas fuel oil in pre-IMO push

The United States is taking advantage of record-low prices of one of the world’s dirtiest fuels by buying record volumes, which it intends to upgrade into cleaner products before new shipping rules take effect, trading and analyst sources say. https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/u-s-scoops-up-overseas-fuel-oil-in-pre-imo-push/

7. Flurry of spot cargoes sell as new IMO rules loom

Angolan crude cargoes flew off the shelf this week as refiners mopped up heavy, sweet oil that produces high yields of fuel that will comply with new IMO rules on shipping from January. https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/flurry-of-spot-cargoes-sell-as-new-imo-rules-loom/

8. Singapore Welcomes Its Largest Containership to Date

The ultra large container vessel (ULCV) is one of the eleven new ships from Mediterranean Shipping Company’s (MSC) Gülsün-class of boxships. The Gülsün-Class is currently the world’s largest series of containerships. Featuring a length of 400 meters and a width of 61 meters, the newbuild can carry up to 24 rows of containers, with a height of 13 tiers on deck. Its length exceeds that of the Eiffel Tower and it can transport the equivalent of about 384 million pairs of shoes. https://mobile.worldmaritimenews.com/archives/286195/singapore-welcomes-its-largest-containership-to-date/

9. NRF: Imports at Top US Ports to See Final Tariff-Driven Surge of 2019

Imports at major U.S. retail container ports are expected to see their final surge of the year this month ahead of new tariffs set to take effect in December, according to the National Retail Federation and Hackett Associates.

“Retailers are highly competitive, but the ability to compete has been challenging this year because of the uncertainty of the trade war and continued tariff escalation,” Jonathan Gold, NRF Vice President for Supply Chain and Customs Policy, said. https://mobile.worldmaritimenews.com/archives/286194/nrf-imports-at-top-us-ports-to-see-final-tariff-driven-surge-of-2019/

10. U.S. Scoops Up Overseas Fuel Oil In Pre-IMO Push

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The United States is taking advantage of record-low prices of one of the world’s dirtiest fuels by buying record volumes, which it intends to upgrade into cleaner products before new shipping rules take effect, trading and analyst sources say.

U.S. trade sources said it recently had become economical to ship fuel oil from countries such as Russia, boosting imports of the product into the United States. https://www.shippingtribune.com/news/shipping/U.S.+scoops+up+overseas+fuel+oil+in+pre-IMO+push

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