Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 15/10/2018

Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 15/10/2018

1. Newbuild Box Ship Allision
CMA CGM’s newbuild 10,000 teu boxship CMA CGM Mumbai hit a pier at the Jawaharlal Nehru Port in India on Saturday while it was attempting to berth at the port. The bow of the ship and the pier both suffered minor damage and no injuries were reported in the incident. According to local reports, preliminary investigations showed the ship suffered a steering system failure when trying to make a turn. The ship, built by Yangzijiang Shipbuilding, was delivered to the ship’s owner Seaspan in May this year when it started a three-year charter contract with CMA CGM.
http://bit.ly/2Pykj6j

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2. ONE Becomes Two
Two members of container grouping THE Alliance are joining forces for feeder operations in Asia and Europe. Japan’s Ocean Network Express (ONE) and Germany’s Hapag-Lloyd have concluded a bilateral feeder agreement covering intra-Asia and intra-European trades with a view to growing the relationship in other trades around the world. “This new cooperation is another strong footnote to the existing bilateral partnership. We are convinced that together with Hapag-Lloyd, Ocean Network Express will continue to enrich our feeder network portfolio” commented Jeremy Nixon, CEO of ONE.
http://bit.ly/2pP9Jwy

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3. Refineries Blamed for Costs
Had 30 refineries around the world spent $1bn each years ahead of the global sulphur cap the issue would have been dealt with at source, rather than risking the potential $200bn bill shipping might have to pay in the run up to – and enforcement of – the IMO’s crackdown on bunker fuels. That was the view of Bjørn Højgaard, CEO of shipmanagement giant Anglo-Eastern. Højgaard also described installing scrubbers as “insane”. For those who choose to install scrubbers, Højgaard warned they are sensitive pieces of equipment sitting in the hostile, hot and acidy environment of a ship’s funnel.
http://bit.ly/2Oop1a9

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4. Cargo Ship Capsizes
A Panama-flagged cargo ship listed then capsized in the Black Sea on Saturday. The vessel was carrying scrap metal and sank about 50 miles from the coast in about 6,500 feet (1,900 meters) of water. The crew, two from Turkey and six from Azerbaijan, boarded a life raft and were safely rescued by a tanker after a distress message was sent by the captain. They have reportedly been taken to the Russian port of Novorossiysk by the Minerva Marine tanker. Investigations have revealed that the list was possibly due to displacement of the cargo and that there is no threat of pollution from the sunken vessel.
http://bit.ly/2Or2ERx

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5. New Face of Singapore Shipping
Quah Ley Hoon had been named by Singapore’s Ministry of Transport as the new chief executive of the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA), taking over on January 1, 2019 from Andrew Tan. Quah, who will join MPA as chief executive (designate) from November 1, has held leadership role within the Prime Minister’s Office, at the Ministry of Finance and also government media giant Mediacorp. Tan leaves MPA after five years in the role, and is retiring from public service after 27 years.
http://bit.ly/2PGQaS8

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6. Diverse Impact of Fuel Change
As the 1st of January 2020 is edging closer, the effects of the IMO 2020 rule on burning cleaner marine fuels are bound to be diverse, across all ship classes. One such case is the Handy product tanker range. In its latest weekly report, shipbroker Gibson said that “looking at the orderbook for Handysize product carriers (25-39,999 dwt), one might think that this size range presents an attractive investment opportunity, with just three vessels currently under construction; the lowest orderbook of any tanker asset class”.
http://bit.ly/2ygAeja

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7. Pakistan Piracy Spat
Pakistan’s navy has pulled out of anti-piracy operations in the western Indian Ocean, following disagreements with the US. Naval ships will no longer operate with the counterpiracy Combined Task Force (CTF) due to a decision by the US to cut fuel subsidies for Pakistani patrol boats. The force was set up to quell an outbreak of piracy off the coast of Somalia and beyond, particularly in the western Indian Ocean region Shipping in the area now operates relatively unheeded thanks to the multinational task force Pakistan played a lead role in the naval armada, and headed the task force on several occasions.
http://bit.ly/2AatnsC

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8. New Guidelines for New Fuel
An IMO sub-committee has completed draft interim guidelines for the safety of ships using methyl/ethyl alcohol as fuel, setting them on course for formal approval by the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) in 2020. The goal of these guidelines is to provide for safe and environmentally-friendly design, construction and operation of ships and in particular their installations of systems for propulsion machinery, auxiliary power generation machinery and/or other purpose machinery using methyl/ethyl alcohol as fuel.
http://bit.ly/2IVdhWz

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9. No Deal Guidance Documents
Guidance on exemptions from maritime security notifications and the recognition of seafarer certificates of competency are among 28 documents published by the UK government as part of its planning for a “no deal‟ Brexit. The UK has published guidance documents on how seafarers and shipping companies would be affected by a no-deal Brexit, drawing the ire of the country’s largest maritime union. They are among a batch of 28 documents, including contingency plans for driving licences and passports. A separate document tackles the recognition of seafarer certificates of competency if there is no Brexit deal.
http://bit.ly/2IVP6Yh

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10. Storm Set to Lash Portugal
After a three-week journey around the Atlantic Ocean, Leslie was on track to hit Portugal with winds of near-hurricane force — only the third time in 176 years that a storm this powerful has made it to the Iberian Peninsula. Storm warnings cover Portugal, according to the Portuguese Institute for Sea and Atmosphere. Leslie’s sustained winds fell to less than hurricane strength as it raced toward the coast at more than 30 mph. It is expected to make landfall within hours.
http://bit.ly/2AalxiV

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Daily news feed from Seacurus Ltd – providers of MLC crew insurance solutions www.seacurus.com

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