Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 04/09/2018




Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 04/09/2018

1. Crew Killed by Fumes
Two crew members of the chemical tanker Key Fighter died last weekend after they were poisoned during tank cleaning. Police are still investigating the circumstances of the incident, but the vessel’s manager reports that they were exposed to hydrogen sulfide
gas. The 5,000 dwt Key Fighter trades between Norwegian ports carrying vegetable oils, according to NRK. She is managed by Fjord Shipping of Måløy, Norway and owned by Sea Tank Chartering of Bergen. At the time of the accident,
the Fighter was under way from Norway to the UK on a ballast transit, and maintenance work was being performed on board. 
http://bit.ly/2NgoANG
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2. German Fleet Shrinking
The German market share of the world’s merchant fleet has dropped from 8.3% in 2008 to 5.9% today. Will it continue to slide? Red ink has sunk many blue ribbon names in German shipping in the past couple of years as banks
have finally sought to get their balance sheets into order. The huge clear-out and consolidation has seen famous brands such as Rickmers Shipmanagement, Conti Group and Ahrenkiel Steamship all sink without trace. 
The German
fleet has contracted by one third in terms of ships in the space of the past six years and many experts suspect the consolidation period is far from over.
http://bit.ly/2MNKdFS
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3. Harsh Reality of Global Shipping
Brexiteers are hoping that the red ensign will fly over more ships once they have "taken back control". One marooned ship exposes theses claims, according to The Guardian. The case of the Malaviya Twenty and its crew isn’t a one-off. Foreign companies
have stranded other unpaid crews here. Though working in British waters between British ports, foreign ships are cheaper and use foreign labour, with a disastrous effect on British sailors. 
http://bit.ly/2ML7ok3
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4. Evergreen Time for Celebration
Taiwan’s Evergreen Group celebrated its 50th anniversary on Saturday. The group founded by Dr Chang Yung-Fa owns Eva Air and Evergreen Line, the world’s seventh largest boxline. The anniversary was celebrated at the Chang
Yung-Fa Foundation, home of the charity set up by the Evergreen founder. Chang passed away in January 2016 aged 88. 
Born in 1927, the son of a seafarer, Chang began his maritime career at the age of 14, working for Japanese
line Miname Nippon Steamship’s office in the city of Keelung in northern Taiwan. Taiwan at the time was under Japanese control. 
http://bit.ly/2wDtICf
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5. Time for Cargo Action
The Isle of Man Ship Registry has published its Casualty Investigation Report of the M/V Cheshire and called upon the IMO to act on its recommendations. In August 2017, the 2012 built vessel was fully loaded with cargo declared
by the shipper as being “Ammonium Nitrate Based Fertilizer (Non-hazardous)” and not liable to self-sustaining decomposition, suffered cargo decomposition that led to rising temperatures in the cargo holds and the generation of toxic gases. The decomposition
progressed, the vessel’s Master took the decision to evacuate the crew and 
the vessel was declared a constructive total loss.
http://bit.ly/2CnHEWm
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6. Leaders Discuss Scrubbers
Shipping industry leaders, joined by Goldman Sachs, discussed IMO 2020 challenges and opportunities at an ABS panel discussion held at the start of SMM 2018. Christian Lelong, senior commodities analyst at Goldman Sachs;
Aaron Bresnahan, vice president marine solutions, Wartsila; Paddy Rodgers, CEO of tanker giant Euronav; Wolfgang Hintzsche, marine director at the German Shipowners’ Association; Lars Robert Pederson, Bimco’s deputy secretary general and moderator Kirsi Tikka
from ABS explored IMO 2020 from multiple perspectives.
http://bit.ly/2PvhnqG
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7. Passage Plan Failures
The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has released the final report into the near grounding of the bulk carrier Aquadiva in Newcastle Harbour last year, finding that the ship’s bridge crew had not received the harbor pilot’s passage plan before
he boarded and that it was different to their plan. This meant the harbor pilot and the bridge crew did not have a shared understanding of how the ship’s passage was to proceed. The ship’s route and speeds down the channel were
discussed between the pilot and master, but they did not compare the ship’s passage plan with the pilot’s plan. 
http://bit.ly/2LVIysn
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8. Fire Onboard Philippine Ferry
A fire broke out on board a passenger ferry MV Lite Ferry 28 on Sunday, September 2, while the ship was in the vicinity of Taloot Port Argao, Cebu, the Philippine Coast Guard informed. The ferry was en route to Cebu Port
from Tagbiliran, Bohol with 97 passengers, 27 crew and four rolling cargoes on board when the incident occurred. 
Once informed of the fire, the coast guard sent a multi-role response vessel BRP Capones to render necessary
assistance. The passengers and crew of the ferry were transferred to the landing craft tank Miami, which was plying nearby the incident area.
http://bit.ly/2wGea0r
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9.  Straddle Carrier Port Death
A New Zealand has man died after his straddle carrier overturned at Ports of Auckland in New Zealand. He was taken to Auckland City Hospital, but died from his injuries. Ports of Auckland chief executive Tony Gibson said
the news was devastating, and the port is providing support for the man’s family, friends and staff. The company and WorkSafe are both investigating. 
The incident occurred despite Union calls for enforceable regulations
and improved safety standards on the New Zealand waterfront, following three deaths in New Zealand in 2017. 
http://bit.ly/2MNKqc8
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10. MSC Shifts Ships from Felixstowe
MSC has become the latest line to divert one of its services away from the Port of Felixstowe as disruption and delays continue at the UK port following the introduction of a new terminal operating system in June. MSC, and
its vessel sharing agreement partners, are switching their IPAK service from calling at Felixstowe to London Gateway. 
Noting the service interruptions at Felixstowe the container line said: “MSC has therefore been implementing
a number of contingency measures to ease the impact of these interruptions on our customers.”
http://bit.ly/2NNTlXh
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Daily news feed from Seacurus Ltd – providers of MLC crew insurance solutions  www.seacurus.com
S. Jones
Seacurus Ltd
Seacurus Ltd.,
Barbican Group,  
33 Gracechurch Street,
London EC3V 0BT,
UK
www.seacurus.com
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