InterManager Daily News 02.10.2019.

1. Historic oil volumes and the belief in profits caused Trafigura to sell its ships
As a shareholder in both Frontline and Scorpio Tankers, Trafigura might be able to make a quick profit in a market, in which the inauguration of major oil field Johan Sverdrup in a few weeks is boosting spirits among tanker shipping companies. But the role of shareholder also comes at a risk. https://shippingwatch.com/secure/carriers/Tanker/article11650571.ece

2. Climate requirements for shipping may jeopardize safety
Shipping risks jeopardizing safety in order to comply with the new climate requirements, assesses Norwegian classification company DNV GL. Euronav’s stockpiling of nearly 420,000 tons of fuel is an attempt to safeguard the company against problems. https://shippingwatch.com/secure/regulation/article11651437.ece

3. Blockchain pioneer closes booking platform – more could follow suit
300 Cubits, one of the best-known pioneers within blockchain in shipping, is closing its booking platform for containers as it has not been able to break even. The elimination race among digital freight companies has begun, says analyst. https://shippingwatch.com/secure/logistics/article11650061.ece

4. IMO to discuss limits on engine power
Instead of implementing speed limits on shipping to cut down carbon emissions, individual ships’ engine power can be limited, Bimco says in one proposal to be assessed by the IMO. https://shippingwatch.com/secure/regulation/article11651169.ece

5. Oman Shipping seeks to expand fleet with ships built by China
Oman Shipping Company (OSC) has ambitions to expand its fleet and is exploring options with its Chinese partners, the company’s CEO Michael Jorgensen said in an interview with CGTN. The company recently held a naming ceremony for the latest addition to the company’s dry bulk fleet, the Jabal Shams. The ceremony marked the official handover of the vessel from Chinese shipbuilder Zhoushan Changhong Shipyard to OSC. Four dry cargo vessels due to be delivered to OSC this year will increase the company’s offering in the dry bulk market in response to growing customer demand. https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/oman-shipping-seeks-to-expand-fleet-with-ships-built-by-china/

6. Where and Why Do Modern Pirate Attacks Happen?
When you hear about pirates, the first thing that probably comes to mind is images of an era long past, with rebellious swashbucklers gallivanting across the seven seas in search of treasure. But piracy in the modern era takes a very different form, mostly in regions where “weak states” are easily corruptible and scarce economic opportunities in legal forms of work make piracy an appealing alternative. https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/where-and-why-do-modern-pirate-attacks-happen/

7. Asia’s demand for Middle East oil undimmed by Abqaiq attack
Asia has become a key arena for Middle East and US crude suppliers. With Asian refiners diversifying in the face the greater geopolitical risk and more crude options, power has shifted. Opec’s dominant oil producers cannot just rely on their unparalleled reign of heavy sourer crudes and will have to learn to manage the new reality. https://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/asias-demand-for-middle-east-oil-undimmed-by-abqaiq-attack/

8. NYK Claims First Autonomous Ship Test Under New IMO Guidelines
Japanese shipping group NYK is claiming the world’s first trial of an autonomous ship following International Maritime Organization preliminary guidelines for autonomous surface ships. NYK says the trial was conducting using its 70,826 gross tonne pure car and truck carrier Iris Leader, which is operated by the group. https://gcaptain.com/nyk-claims-first-autonomous-ship-test-under-new-imo-guidelines/

9. EU Parliament votes nay to new transport commissioner again
The legal committee of the European Parliament has once again decided that the nominated transport commissioner is unqualified for the job. The next move lies with the coming president of the EU Commission. https://shippingwatch.com/secure/article11651613.ece

10. Ships Set to Burn Raw Crude Oil to Beat New Clean Fuel Rules
For almost three years, the oil industry has been puzzling over how to supply merchant ships with fuel that will meet tough new environmental standards. Turns out part of the solution was sitting in the ground and under ocean floors all the while: crude oil. Oil from off the U.K.’s coast, which requires blending – but no refining – before being used as a ship fuel, is now being marketed as just that. Similar crudes from places like West Africa and Australia can also be used with little modification. Suitable supplies are ideally low in sulfur and not too flammable. https://www.shippingtribune.com/news/shipping/Ships+Set+to+Burn+Raw+Crude+Oil+to+Beat+New+Clean+Fuel+Rules

0 Comments

Leave a reply

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

©2019 InterManager - Promoting Excellence In Ship Management

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?