Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 27/12/2018

Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 27/12/2018

1. Huge Japanese Order Book
Japanese owners boast the world’s largest orderbook, according to data from Clarksons Research. While the Asian nation might be behind market leader Greece and neighbour China in terms of its existing fleet, Japan’s orderbook is by far the largest in the world, more than 40% bigger than Greece’s. With data available from December 1, Japan has 25.2m gt on order, equivalent to 15% of its extent fleet. China has the second largest orderbook, with 20.5m gt on order while Greece, which has led the world when it comes to S&P for the last couple of years, is in third spot with 17.5m gt.
http://bit.ly/2BDEMki

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2. Box Ship Collision
French containership operator CMA CGM’s 9,415 teu post panamax boxship CMA CGM Norma collided with Chinese general cargo ship Yusheng366 near Hong Kong waters on Monday. CMA CGM Norma suffered minor damage while Yusheng366 sank from the collision after the crew had abandoned the ship. Guangdong Maritime Safety Administration has confirmed that all the crew from the ship have been rescued. The administration has issued alerts to nearby vessels to avoid the collision area.
http://bit.ly/2ShsdCm

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3. Double Box Ship Collision
Two containerships operated by Quanzhou Ansheng Shipping, a shipping unit of Renjian Group, were involved in an accident at Guangzhou’s Nansha Port. The 4,380 teu Ren Jian 15 was trying to berth at the port and went out of control, running into the 698-teu Hai Su 10, which was berthed at the port. Several containers on Hai Su 10 fell off and 16 containers were damaged in the incident. Both ships suffered damages to their hulls. Hai Su 10 listed to one side following the collision and the port deployed an emergency team to stabilise the vessel after pumping water out of the vessel.
http://bit.ly/2VdTasK

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4. Three Weeks at Sea
The Royal Caribbean cruise ship Empress of the Seas rescued two fishermen who had been adrift for three weeks. The Empress was off the coast of Cuba and had diverted from her normal itinerary due to a storm; if not for the weather routing, she would not have been in the right place to spot the survivors. The two fishermen had set their nets off Puerto Limon, Costa Rica on December 1. While they rested, the wind picked up, and it blew them far away from their gear. They used up all of their fuel trying to return to their nets, and their boat drifted for the next three weeks.
http://bit.ly/2ESgdmO

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5. Up Your Cyber Game
According to a recent report backed by IBM, the average cost of a data breach is now $3.86 million, up 6.4 percent from last year. The same report, the result of a study by the Ponemon Institute, found that the likelihood of a company that had been the victim of an attack suffering a second hack is 30 percent.
The report covered all industry sectors – transportation and, in particular, the shipping industry, were not singled out – but experts point out that shipping really does need to “up its game.” It’s up to all companies to really begin to gain more awareness of cyber risks, cyber resilience or cyber hygiene is key.
http://bit.ly/2CA768O

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6. Ukrainian Appeal Fails
An appeals court in Russian-occupied Crimea judges that five Ukrainian Navy sailors captured by Russian forces will not be released. 19 of their shipmates also remain in captivity, and have already exhausted the appeals process. The Ukrainian servicemembers stand accused of an “illegal border crossing” and face up to six years’ imprisonment. The international community does not recognize a Russian maritime “border” in or near Kerch Strait; in addition to the freedom of navigation protections afforded by UNCLOS, Ukrainian access to the Sea of Azov is separately guaranteed by a bilateral treaty with Moscow.
http://bit.ly/2T7vrZg

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7. Diesel Cargoes Head West
A diesel glut in Asia is encouraging traders to ramp up cargoes from India to Europe, where stockpiles were ravaged by refinery halts and unusual weather. Around 577,000 tons of the fuel already arrived this month or are en route to Europe from India’s refineries — whose supplies get sent east or west depending on demand. The cargoes will arrive this month and next, implying about a doubling in the normal flow rate. Unexpected halts at a batch of refineries, particularly in Germany, caused the diesel market in Europe’s Amsterdam-Rotterdam-Antwerp trading hub to surge.
http://bit.ly/2QRolLK

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8. Shipping Gets Smarter
The adoption of “smart” technology – for both equipment and systems – will escalate across the maritime sector in 2019, even if the verifiable benefits of the projects that start this year will take longer to emerge. The transition to smart will continue to be driven by vendor leadership and advances in the data sciences that support immediate, data driven, condition-based performance assessments of shipping and offshore assets. Rather than think of “smart” as individual pieces of technology, for maritime applications it is instructive to think in terms of functionality.
http://bit.ly/2BEcRAE

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9. Size No Longer Matters
When the $1.35 billion Symphony of the Seas steamed out of Barcelona on its maiden voyage in April, it instantly claimed the title of world’s largest cruise ship. At 228,000 gross tonnes, Symphony is a tad larger than the previous titleholder, its two-year-old sister, the Harmony of the Seas. But dive deeper into the stats and the victory looks iffy. It’s actually the same length and carries fewer passengers, a maximum of 6,680. Owner Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., which has continually led the industry with its ever-larger vessels, says size won’t matter as much as it used to.
http://bit.ly/2AiLfBj

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10. Indonesian Port Reopens
Indonesian Port of Merak has reopened following a tsunami which struck the country’s coastline on Saturday. The Port of Merak opened in the morning hours of December 24, GAC informed. No change to draft restrictions at its two terminals, approach channels or anchorage is reported. However, vessels should be alert to the possibility of floating materials around the terminals, according to GAC. Additionally, the Indonesian transportation ministry confirmed that Merak-Bakauheni ferry port facilities suffered no damages, Tempo.co reported.
http://bit.ly/2Reby5x

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Daily news feed from Seacurus Ltd – providers of MLC crew insurance solutions www.seacurus.com

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