Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 30/11/2018

Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 30/11/2018

1. Ban on Open Scrubbers
Singapore, is to ban the use of open-loop scrubbers in its waters. Andrew Tan, the outgoing chief executive of the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA), said the decision to ban open-loop scrubbers had been made to protect the local marine environment. An open-loop scrubber uses seawater as the medium for cleaning or scrubbing the exhaust. Seawater is normally supplied by a dedicated pump. CO2 dissolves in seawater forming carbonic acid, bicarbonate or carbonate ions depending on the pH. In a closed loop-type scrubber, water is circulated through the scrubber independently.
http://bit.ly/2BHv5CF

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2. Time to Address Liners
One of the best-known authorities on liner shipping regulation today calls for an international body to look into the power of container alliances. Professor Mary Brooks from Rowe School of Business at Dalhousie University will shortly give a speech at a conference organised by the Federation of European Private Port Operators (FEPORT) in Brussels in which she will hit out at the lack of universal liner regulation and warn on the growing strength of liner alliances. Brooks joins a growing list of people hitting out at the power of the three leading container alliances who control the majority of the container market.
http://bit.ly/2zwGMdY

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3. Smart Large Bulker
The first VLOC to implement DNV GL’s SmartShip descriptive notation has been launched. To qualify for the notation, Pacific Vision has been outfitted with an integration platform, a smart navigation decision support system, a ship energy efficiency management and optimization system, and smart-vessel operation and maintenance system. “With the SmartShip notation, we wanted to give customers a platform to clearly present the new technologies they were utilizing to optimize performance, enhance safety, and minimize their environmental impact”, DNV GL’s Regional Manager Greater China, said.
http://bit.ly/2E3Gm2L

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4. Chip Fat Fuel
Denmark’s Norden becomes the latest shipowner to offer clients shipments powered by vegetable oil. Norden’s CEO Jan Rindbo said in an interview with Bloomberg his company has trialled vegetable oil as a fuel this year and will roll it out as a service for clients looking to green their supply chains from next year. Netherlands-based GoodFuels Marine, backed by Vitol Group’s Varo Energy, will supply the fuel, which is used vegetable oil. In September this year used cooking oil was used in a landmark container voyage in Europe onboard the 800 teu Samskip Endeavour, also using GoodFuels Marine’s fuel.
http://bit.ly/2DS5WGX

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5. Ports Grind to Halt
Ukraine’s government says that shipping has come to a near-halt at the ports of Mariupol and Berdyansk, which have been cut off by delays at Kerch Strait following last weekend’s altercation between Russian and Ukrainian forces. According to Ukrainian infrastructure minister Volodymyr Omelyan, only ships bound for Russian ports on the Sea of Azov are being allowed to pass through the strait. Vessels headed for Ukrainian ports on the sea are still being blocked, he alleged. Omelyan said that 35 ships are presently affected, including ships that are outbound from the Sea of Azov or waiting at the pier.
http://bit.ly/2E3LNhX

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6. Frigate Collision Report
The Accident Investigation Board of Norway (AIBN) has released its preliminary report on its investigation into the November 8 collision involving the Norwegian frigate ‘KNM Helge Ingstad’ and a laden commercial oil tanker Sola TS near the Sture terminal in Hjeltefjorden, Norway. The collision resulted in extensive damage to the frigate, leading to the abandoning of the ship and its sinking close to shore. Only minor damage was sustained by the tanker. There were no serious injuries among the 137 sailors on board the frigate and 23 crewmembers of the Sola TS.
http://bit.ly/2rarwik

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7. ONE Giant Underestimation
The Ocean Network Express (ONE) management “underestimated the initial launch resource requirement” in April, resulting in a significant loss of business and a $400m impact on its bottom line. This was the stark admission of chief executive Jeremy Nixon to a group of investors in Tokyo this week.
Profitability from synergy cost savings of $1bn a year was promised from the merger of the container businesses of Japanese shipping groups K Line, MOL and NYK – instead the carrier expects a net loss of $600m for its first year of operation.
http://bit.ly/2QxbEVg

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8. Shame of Shady STS
Brazil has more than doubled the number of risky ship-to-ship oil transfers this year, but its monitoring of such offshore maneuvers is lax, to a point where a July 2017 collision between two tankers was not reported, according to a Reuters review of government and shipping records. Transfers are projected to keep rising as the country’s deep-water discoveries have lured major companies including Exxon Mobil Corp and Royal Dutch Shell Plc to recent offshore auctions. During these maneuvers, ships pull alongside one another and oil is transferred to a vessel via high-pressure hoses.
http://bit.ly/2PagaEL

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9. Livestock Stability Issues
Australia ordered that all cattle be removed from a Panama-flagged livestock carrier after the vessel ran into stability issues shortly after leaving port last Thursday. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority ordered that the vessel, named Jawan, be detained as it investigated. The incident took place at Australia’s Port of Portland. According to reports, the Jawan was departing for Muscat, Oman with 4,327 cattle on board when it began listing heavily, forcing the pilot to return the ship to port. Video of the incident shows the Jawan rolling violently from side to side in seemingly calm, sheltered waters.
http://bit.ly/2BHTB6w

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10. Ballast Enforcers Find Faults
As ballast water management regulations shift towards enforcement, shipowners are finding that the majority of ballast water treatment systems (BWTS) installed do not function properly. The scale of operational challenges with BWTS fitted by tanker owners was revealed by Intertanko at a forum in Singapore on Friday. Tim Wilkins, regional manager (Asia-Pacific), environment director, Intertanko, said the feedback from its members was that in their assessment 60% – 80% of systems did not work correctly. This does not mean the systems do not work at all, but do not function in the way they should.
http://bit.ly/2SftrOa

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Daily news feed from Seacurus Ltd – providers of MLC crew insurance solutions www.seacurus.com

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