Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 28/09/2018

Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 28/09/2018

1. San Diego Cyber Hit
The Port of San Diego has been hit by a cyber attack, affecting more than 500 workers. The attack took place on Tuesday and has spread to many departments of the US west coast port. In a statement published Wednesday, the port’s CEO Randa Coniglio said the hack impacted issuing of park permits, public records requests and the Harbor Police. “The Port of San Diego has experienced a serious cybersecurity incident that has disrupted the agency’s information technology systems,” Coniglio stated. The port mobilised a team of industry experts and local, regional, state and federal partners to fix the issue.
http://bit.ly/2xJqGg5

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2. Barcelona Port Hit Too
The cyber security attack that hit the Port of San Diego on Tuesday included ransomware and demand for Bitcoin, port officials said in a statement Friday. The attack is the second at a major global port this month with experts warning ports are coming under ever-greater attack from hackers. It has emerged that the port of Barcelona also suffered a cyber attack last week, and back in July Cosco’s massive cyber attack originated from its operations at the port of Long Beach.
http://bit.ly/2N7F9Hq

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3. Petrobras Giant Fines
Brazilian energy major Petrobras has agreed to pay a combined total of $853.2m in penalties to resolve the US government’s investigation into violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) in connection with Petrobras’s role in facilitating payments to politicians and political parties in Brazil, as well as a related Brazilian investigation. “Executives at the highest levels of Petrobras-including members of its executive board and board of directors-facilitated the payment of hundreds of millions of dollars in bribes to Brazilian politicians and political parties and then cooked the books to conceal the bribe payments.
http://bit.ly/2DDUgZR

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4. CEO Steps Down
Louis Dreyfus Company announced the surprise departures of its chief executive and head of finance on Tuesday, triggering another reshuffle at the commodities giant as it strives to recover from weak agricultural markets. The group said in a statement that Gonzalo Ramirez Martiarena had resigned as CEO after three years in the post to pursue other opportunities, and would be replaced with immediate effect by Ian McIntosh, previously chief strategy officer. British national McIntosh, 57, has worked for the family-owned group for over 30 years and became strategy chief earlier this.
http://bit.ly/2OZnkMR

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5. Famous Old Name Vanishes
A famous pioneering name in Norwegian shipping is to be wound up. A court in Singapore has heard that creditors led by Nordea have decided to cease support for IMSK, formerly IM Skaugen. In late June the Norwegian gas carrier operator was granted a three-month moratorium by the High Court of Singapore to preserve the company’s restructuring process, but in the end creditors decided to liquidate the company headed by Morits Skaugen, the third generation at the helm of the shipping firm, one of Norway’s most famous tanker names.
http://bit.ly/2NMIDEM

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6. HMM Buys Big
South Korea’s flagship line HMM signed formal contracts for its 20 mega containerships with three the nation’s top three shipyards – Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME), Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) and Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI). DSME and SHI will build seven and five 23,000 teu containerships, respectively, which are expected for delivery in the second quarter of 2020. HHI will construct eight 15,000 teu containerships to be delivered in the second quarter of 2021.
http://bit.ly/2xJCLSo

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7. Trump Eases Offshore Safety
The Trump administration on Thursday eased safety rules on offshore oil and gas production put in place after the deadly 2010 BP Plc Deepwater Horizon disaster, as part of its effort to slash regulations and boost the energy industry. The Interior Department revised the 2016 well control rule, also known as the oil and gas production safety system rule, which the Obama administration enacted after the disaster that killed 11 oil rig workers, led to the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history and cost BP about $65 billion. The final rule will appear in the federal register as soon as Friday.
http://bit.ly/2zAMlbC

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8. BIMCO Rushes Clauses
International shipping association BIMCO is fast-tracking the publishing of its first clause related to the International Maritime Organization’s 2020 sulphur emission rules. BIMCO will produce several clauses dealing with specific issues relating to IMO 2020, which sets a new limit for the amount of sulphur in fuel oil of 0.5% for ships operating outside designated emission control areas. The new regulation will affect more than 70,000 ships globally. The new clause, focused on 2020 compliance, has been fast-tracked and may be published as soon as the end of October, BIMCO said in a statement.
http://bit.ly/2xWqLMS

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9. Struggling With Wind
Few European ports have the infrastructure to support floating offshore wind development, according to research undertaken as part of the Floating Wind Joint Industry Project. Only a few ports in Scotland, Norway and Spain, out of the 96 examined, were found to have the necessary infrastructure, according to the report published on behalf of the Carbon Trust, LOC Renewables, WavEC and Cathie Associates. The infrastructure required includes a large set-down area and a wet storage area for assembled units.
http://bit.ly/2QdUgBi

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10. Europe Looking at Liners
The European Commission is inviting comments on the legal framework exempting liner shipping consortia from EU antitrust rules that prohibit anticompetitive agreements between companies, known as the ‘Consortia Block Exemption Regulation’. Container shipping organised on the basis of liner consortia accounts for the majority of non-bulk freight carried by sea to and from Europe. Competitive shipping services are therefore essential for the EU’s economy as a whole. EU law generally bans agreements between companies that restrict competition.
http://bit.ly/2N6ywFt

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Daily news feed from Seacurus Ltd – providers of MLC crew insurance solutions www.seacurus.com

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