Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 31/05/2018




Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 31/05/2018

1. More Giant Bulker Problems
South Korean owner Polaris Shipping’s 1994-built very large ore carrier  Stellar Samba suffered a fire in its engine room off the Brazilian coast earlier this week. The fire started from
the ship’s generator due to an oil leak, and while the crew managed to put out the fire the vessel lost power. No casualties were reported in the incident. 
Brazilian maritime authorities have sent a tugboat to tow the vessel
to port and navy ships will monitor the ship’s condition. 
AIS tracking information shows the vessel’s status as not under command, and en route to Ponta da Madeira in Brazil.
https://bit.ly/2IUojyN
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2. Shippers Hit by Costs
Leading shippers have hit out at the rush by struggling boxlines to implement emergency bunker surcharges. After a series of weak first quarter results from the world’s top containerlines, many have introduced emergency bunker
surcharges of anywhere from $60 to $90 per teu in the past few days, a move that has been lashed by customers. 
Average operating margin for the eleven largest shipping lines that published results fell to -3.3% in the first
quarter – the worst performance since Q3 of 2016, according to statistics from Alphaliner.
https://bit.ly/2IXddJo
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3. Waves Catching CO2
A new study has found ocean waves play a greater role in this trapping carbon dioxide than previously thought. When waves break on the surface, such as in high winds, a substantial number
of bubbles are injected to depths of at least a meter. These bubbles tend to partially dissolve, releasing carbon dioxide into the water.  
The discovery means an increase in the current global estimates of the oceanic sink
of carbon dioxide and rates of ocean acidification. Additionally, the amount of CO2 that dissolves into stormy seas through bubbles will increase as the proportion of CO2 in the atmosphere increases.
https://bit.ly/2srdRn7
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4. New Safety Checklist
An electronic checklist that collects and manages a variety of data through the use of tablet computers is now being used on 50 vessels operated by Japan’s Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK) and will continue to be introduced on more vessels in the future. This
system enables efficient data management of onboard equipment and the sharing of that data with offices on land. In collaboration with other systems, the system is expected to contribute to condition-based maintenance (CBM) as a data collection and analysis
tool to enhance preventive maintenance.
https://bit.ly/2srKIrY
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5. Canada Buys Pipeline
Canada’s federal government will buy the Trans Mountain oil pipeline from Houston-based energy infrastructure firm Kinder Morgan for $3.4bn. Energy advocates hope the move will help break a logjam in progress of the project,
which has been stymied by authorities in British Columbia. 
The pipeline is intended to bring oil from Alberta’s prolific oil sands to a terminal in southern British Columbia with a view to shipping exports to Asian markets. Without
the pipeline to reach Pacific seaports, supporters say, Canada will be too dependent on the US as a customer, meaning producers are not maximizing their potential income.
https://bit.ly/2J26dqw
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6. Exporters Slam BREXIT Dream
British manufacturers turned up the pressure on the government to abandon one of its post-Brexit customs proposals, slamming the idea of a technology-based plan for border checks as naive and a waste of money. Prime Minister
Theresa May has ruled out Britain staying in a customs union with the EU bloc – to the dismay of many employers groups – and says her government is working on two possible solutions to minimise delays at Britain’s ports and airports. 
But
the EEF manufacturers’ body said it was unrealistic and naive to think a technological border solution, could be implemented by December 2020.
https://bit.ly/2siXt9g
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7. Bunker Boss Jailed
Lars Moller former chief of the Singapore OW Bunker subsidiary at the centre of the Danish company’s spectacular collapse and bankruptcy in November 2014 has been sentenced to jail. A Danish court found Moller guilty of criminal
breach of trust and sentenced him to one half years in jail and barred him from sitting on company boards.
Moller was in charge of Dynamic Oil Trading, a Singapore subsidiary, which ran up debts of $125m in credit sleeving scheme, which were only uncovered 48 hours before OW Bunker collapsed into bankruptcy.
https://bit.ly/2IWNmkT
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8. COSCO Giant Launched
The ultra-large container ship COSCO Shipping Virgo has been delivered by Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipbuilding in China. The 20,000-TEU vessel, which has a deck area as large as four football fields, is 400 meters long and has
a maximum capacity of 200,000 tons. She has a molded beam and depth of 58.6 and 30.7 meters and will sail between the Middle East and Europe. 
Earlier this year, Waigaoqiao delivered the 20,000-TEU COSCO Shipping Taurus.
China’s first 20,000-TEU container ship COSCO Shipping Aries was built by Nantong COSCO KHI Ship Engineering and delivered in January.
https://bit.ly/2IXG3cD
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9. Houston Bunker Problem
Bunkering in Houston has been hit by a serious contamination issue across the supply chain which is causing the sticking of fuel plungers, and fuel pump seizures failures on vessels, warns fuel tester Veritas Petroleum Services (VPS). Since
it issued a bunker alert on 26 April VPS said the problems had affected at least 30 vessels in its programme, “making it one of the most widespread fuel quality issues of recent years”. 
In all samples where vessels in its
programme that have experienced problems VPS has identified the presence of 4-Cumyl-Phenol in samples.
https://bit.ly/2IUBwYc
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10. Strike Paralyses Ports
A truck drivers’ protest over diesel prices that lasted nearly a week has paralysed most of Brazil’s largest ports. The Brazilian press reported Monday that “the military said that the entrances to some ports, such as Santos,
Latin America’s largest export hub, were cleared, but there were still no trucks arriving by late Sunday to the area to replenish silos and allow for ship-loading operations. Soldiers were reluctant to move against truckers, though they did serve as convoys
for some fuel shipments.”
https://bit.ly/2so6rBf
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Daily news feed from Seacurus Ltd – providers of MLC crew insurance solutions  www.seacurus.com
S. Jones
Seacurus Ltd
Seacurus Ltd.,
Barbican Group,  
33 Gracechurch Street,
London EC3V 0BT,
UK
www.seacurus.com
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