Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 04/04/2018




Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 04/04/2018

1. IMO Influence Criticism
Once again the International Maritime Organization (IMO) stands accused today of letting private, corporate interests exert too much influence at the London-headquartered UN body. Transparency International, an anti-corruption
NGO, has blasted the IMO for its shortcomings in its governance framework, 
“Private shipping-industry concerns could have undue influence over the policymaking process at the IMO,” the anti-corruption organisation claimed.
This could undermine the UN agency’s ability to effectively regulate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, something due for debate at MEPC this week.
https://goo.gl/JTRkXX
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2. Autonomous Tech Partnership
Wilhelmsen Group announced that it is launching Massterly, an autonomous-shipping joint venture with technology firm Kongsberg.  "Norway has taken a position at the forefront in developing autonomous ships," said Thomas Wilhelmsen,
Wilhelmsen group CEO. "[Through] Massterly, we take the next step on this journey by establishing infrastructure and services to design and operate vessels, as well as advanced logistics solutions associated with maritime autonomous operations. Massterly will
reduce costs at all levels."
https://goo.gl/ZKKrJD
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3. Huge Fleet Selloff
Clarksons has been appointed by the US Bankruptcy Court to sell off the entire commercial shipping fleet of Gregory Callimanopulos’s Toisa. Toisa and 23 of its affiliated vessel-owning
companies filed for Chapter 11 in the Southern District of New York Bankruptcy Court in January last year. In May, it was hit with a $304.55m tax claim by the US government. 
The company had subsequently put forward a restructuring
proposal to creditors last year, which appears to be ongoing despite the fleet sell-off.
https://goo.gl/aQ5sL5
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4. Transport Tycoon Arrested
The Russian authorities have arrested billionaire Ziyavudin Magomedov, a key player in Russia’s transport sector, on charges of embezzling over $35m of federal budgets. Magomedov is the owner of trading and investment company
Summa Group, which owns controlling stakes in Fesco Transportation Group, the Commercial Port of Vladivostok, Novorossiysk Commercial Sea Port and United Grain Company. 
The Fesco offices in Moscow and Vladivostok and the
Vladivostok Sea Commercial Port were searched by authorities as part of the investigation proceedings against Magomedov.
https://goo.gl/hf5w2n
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5. What is the Worst that Could Happen?
The U.K. Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) has released its latest collection of cases detailing analyses of accidents. “It could be said that the chaos caused by a weather system described by the media as “the
Beast from the East” was exacerbated by a collective failure to prepare for the worst,” says Steve Clinch, Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents, introducing the Safety Digest. “Regular readers of the MAIB’s Safety Digest will be aware that failure by seafarers
to prepare for the worst, or at least properly consider the potential risks before commencing a voyage, operation or task has been an enduring theme".
https://goo.gl/ytU5fv
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6. Urgent Lube Check
The US Coast Guard has issued a Safety Alert urging ship operators to ensure the main propulsion lube oil systems of vessels are in compliance with SOLAS (Safety of Life at Sea), classification society and regulatory standards after its investigation of
the October 2015 El Faro disaster. The inquiry found that loss of propulsion during extreme weather was a major factor in the disaster, which saw the cargo ship and its 33 crew lost when caught in Hurricane Joaquin off the Bahamas.
R
ecovered audio from the bridge suggested the ship lost lube oil pressure to the main propulsion turbine and reduction gear bearings.
https://goo.gl/iHSmtZ
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7. Rebel Tanker Attack
An unnamed Saudi oil tanker came under attack by Houthi rebel forces off Hudaydah (Hodeidah), Yemen. According to Sauid coalition spokesman Col. Turki al-Maliki, Houthi armed militias conducted an unspecified attack on the
tanker at 1330 hours Tuesday, and a coalition naval vessel intervened. The tanker suffered "a slight but ineffective hit" and continued on its northbound course with a naval escort.  
Houthi forces claimed that they had
targeted a Saudi naval vessel in retaliation for a recent Saudi bombing raid on Hudaydah. In the past, the rebels have had modest success in attacking coalition military vessels.  
https://goo.gl/zKd9zB
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8. Pirates Still Operating
A tanker was chased by armed pirates while underway in the Gulf of Aden on March 31. As the pirates closed in on the vessel in two skiffs, they started shooting causing minor damage to the ship, IMB Piracy Reporting Centre
informed. 
The pirates were apparently planning to board the vessel as ladders were sighted in the skiffs, the final objective being raiding the ship for money and valuables and/or taking crew members hostage. However,
their attempt was thwarted by the armed guards onboard the tanker.
https://goo.gl/GNari9
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9. Belgian BREXIT Litmus Test
In Antwerp’s sprawling port, the ripples from Brexit are already apparent. The Belgian port saw trade with the U.K. drop 5 percent in 2017, the first decline in five years. Against that backdrop, Antwerp — described by Napoleon
as a “pistol pointed at the heart of England” — is seeking a representative in the U.K.’s industrial heartlands. 
“We investigated, talked to companies left and right and found that uncertainty around Brexit is a big issue,”
Luc Arnouts, the port’s International Relations and Networks director, said. Those conversations also “gave us the idea that Brexit could be an opportunity as well as a danger.”
https://goo.gl/Jsvfmx
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10. Case for Abandoned Cargoes
Laura Grant, Claims Executive at UK P&I Club, has commented on whether the Club covers the costs involved in an abandoned cargo matter and the short answer is it depends on a case by case basis. However, as a rule (and in fact, in ‘the’ rules) the costs
would have to be over and above what would ordinarily be incurred if the cargo had been collected or removed, it should be solely due to the consignee failing to collect or remove the cargo and the costs must exceed any sales proceeds.” She
said that the best advice was to act quickly, to find out what is needed in the particular jurisdiction.
https://goo.gl/iNTufq
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Daily news feed from Seacurus Ltd – providers of MLC crew insurance solutions  www.seacurus.com
S. Jones
Seacurus Ltd
Seacurus Ltd.,
Barbican Group,  
33 Gracechurch Street,
London EC3V 0BT,
UK
www.seacurus.com
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