Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 16/01/2018




Seacurus Daily: Top Ten Maritime News Stories 16/01/2018

1. Tanker Pollution Fears

In the wake of the sinking of the tanker "Sanchi", researchers are attempting to estimate the impact of the release of her cargo into the marine environment. In addition to the loss of the vessel’s 32 crewmembers, the final explosion and foundering led to what
was likely the largest release of condensate in history.
Sanchi had about one million barrels of condensate on board when she collided, and it is unclear how much of the cargo burned up or evaporated during the seven days she was on fire. If she still had most of her cargo when she went down, the spill may be
larger than the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989.
https://goo.gl/esJbvf
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2. Oil on the Rise
Oil reached new highs in London as OPEC members called for output curbs to continue, allaying concerns that the recent rally could weaken their commitment. Brent crude closed above $70 a barrel for the first time in three years after Iraqi Oil Minister
Jabbar al-Luaibi said Saturday that production curbs have contributed to stability in the market and should remain, echoing comments from Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. The global benchmark had only briefly breached the key level last week.
https://goo.gl/4Nzd2C
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3. Investigating Yard Practices
The European Commission yesterday opened an investigation into tax incentives for shipyards in Poland. The commission believes Warsaw’s flat-rate tax on sales for yards could be construed as operating aid, something that is illegal within the EU. In September
2016, Poland adopted a law giving shipyards operating in Poland an option to pay a 1% flat-rate tax on sales from the building and conversion of ships, instead of paying the generally applicable 19% corporate tax. The current Polish administration targeted
reviving the nation’s shipyards as a key plank of its economic policies.
https://goo.gl/kPfZiB
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4. Run Aground in Fog
Handymax containership "Tzini" ran aground at Bangladesh’s Chittagong Port in heavy fog yesterday, hindering the shipping activities of the port. According to reports, the 1,757 teu boxship was moving from the anchorage to berth at the port and it ran
aground while avoiding a collision with a fishing trawler which suddenly came out of the fog. The vessel was stuck on one side of the shipping channel of the port, and vessels were still able to pass through the other side. The port authority planned to refloat
the vessel during the evening high tide. The vessel is operated by Greek owner Eastern Mediterranean Maritime.
https://goo.gl/dvKows
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5. No Place for Unmanned Tankers
Although the shipping industry is putting greater focus on making remote and autonomous ships a reality, the flurry of developments in this field might not be in the best interest of all shipping markets. On the back of the technological developments in
autonomy, including digitalisation, digital disruption and steps taken towards green shipping, World Maritime News spoke to Gernot Ruppelt, Chief Commercial Officer, Ardmore Shipping, who said that tankers would not benefit from vessel autonomy. “At this stage,
we don’t see a market for unmanned shipping in the tanker sector,” Ruppelt states.
https://goo.gl/wRuAd3
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6. Swooping for Seafarers
Japan’s largest shipping line, Mitsui OSK Lines (MOL), has taken full control of European manning company Azalea Maritime. The Dutch headquartered company, which has subsidiaries in Montenegro, is now rebranded MOL Maritime (Europe). “MOL will enhance
providing top-quality seafarers for MOL-operated LNG carriers and tankers and continue to aim to become a world leader in safe operation,” MOL said. Adding, “MOL Maritime (Europe) B.V. as a manning company, will continue to support MOL safe operation, while
inheriting Azalea Maritime’s accumulated experience with European seafarers.”
https://goo.gl/rtavpR
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7. Zim At Forefront
Israeli container line Zim is setting up a new digital unit as it aims to become a digital leader in the shipping industry. Zim has appointed Liay Geffen as chief digital officer. Geffen joins the shipping from Harel Group where he was VP of marketing and according
to Zim has a proven track record of leading digital transformations and fostering the use of data, analytics and digital engagement with customers. This new position is part of Zim’s sales & customer service directorate headed by VP of sales and customer service,
Saar Dotan.
https://goo.gl/x1q7kT
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8. Allision With Berthed Ship
General cargo ship PEIKKO allided with berthed bulk carrier while leaving Brake, Germany, bound for Aarhus Denmark. Both ships sustained damages, PEIKKO was allowed to continue voyage after inspection and security deposit, because Russian Master was found
guilty of causing collision by miscalculating current and wind strength. PEIKKO resumed sailing but early in the morning Jan 16 she interrupted her voyage and headed for Cuxhaven. The reason for this is yet unknown – either she suffered more serious damages
than estimated, or she was ordered to call German port because of investigation.
https://goo.gl/f6cjYs
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9. Polluters Deemed Unseaworthy
Shipowners could find that their vessels are deemed unseaworthy and their insurance cover is affected by failing to comply with more stringent sulphur emissions (SOx) regulations. The IMO is introducing measures to reduce the sulphur footprint of commercial
shipping vessels. Under Annex VI of the IMO’s MARPOL, the global cap on sulphur emissions will be reduced on Jan.1, 2020 from the current 3.5 percent to 0.5 percent. Shipowners should not assume that insurance cover will continue to remain in place following
a breach of the MARPOL Convention Annex VI after Jan. 1, 2020.
https://goo.gl/S33dGE
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10. Route Canal Treatise
The government of Turkey has released the finalized route for a second shipping channel between the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara, parallel to the Bosporus Strait.  The new waterway – to be known as Kanal Istanbul – would increase capacity for shipping to
and from the Black Sea. The route selected would run between Küçükçekmec in the south, near Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport, to the Sazlýdere Dam and then north to Durusu (in red in the image above). The total length will be about 25 nm, and it will be the nation’s
largest ever infrastructure project. As designed, it will be able to accommodate 160 vessel transits per day.
https://goo.gl/n2ZSNu
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Daily news feed from Seacurus Ltd – providers of MLC crew insurance solutions 
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